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Daily Archives for: April 26th, 2017

Background
A promising approach to the results of chronic ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure is the use of stem cells. The last decade has seen a plethora of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) developed worldwide which have generated conflicting results.

Objectives
The critical evaluation of clinical evidence on the safety and efficacy of autologous adult bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSC) as a results for chronic ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure.

Diabetes mellitus is a well-known risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD), which can lead to acute myocardial infarction, chronic myocardial ischaemia and heart failure. Despite the advantages in medical results, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization,

Background: Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) is the most advanced stage of peripheral arterial disease and is usually treated with bypass surgery or endovascular revascularization. However, a considerable proportion of CLI patients are not eligible to these results strategies and amputation is often the only option left. In the past decade, research has focused on bone marrow (BM)–derived cell-based strategies that aim at neovascularization to improve limb perfusion.

Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to effectively lower blood glucose levels in diabetic individuals, but the mechanism has not been adequately explained. We hypothesized that MSCs exert beneficial paracrine actions on the injured islets by releasing biologically active factors. To prove our hypothesis, we tested the cytoprotective effect of conditioned medium from cultured MSCs on isolated islets exposed to STZ in vitro and on mice islets after the experimental induction of diabetes in vivo.

Aim: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), particularly critical limb ischemia (CLI), is a severe cause of amputation and mortality. More than 50% of diabetic patients with CLI die within four to five years. The development of novel stem cell therapies may bring new hope to these patients. We aimed to assess the efficacy of autologous bone marrow cell for treating CLI using a meta-analysis.

Purpose
Clinical studies in diabetic patients have demonstrated that there is a high incidence of complications in distal tibia and ankle fracture resultss. One strategy to mitigate issues with wound healing and infection in diabetic patients is to use a percutaneous technique in which autologous, bone marrow-derived, concentrated cells are injected at the site of non-unions.

Recent evidence has suggested that diabetic neuropathy (DN) is pathophysiologically related to both impaired angiogenesis and a deficiency of neurotrophic factors in the nerves. It is widely known that vascular and neural growths are intimately associated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote angiogenesis in ischemic diseases and have neuroprotective effects, particularly on Schwann cells. Accordingly, we investigated whether DN could be improved by local transplantation of MSCs by augmenting angiogenesis and neural regeneration such as remyelination.

There is a growing interest in cell-based therapies in T2DM as β-cell failure is progressive and inexorable with the advancing duration of disease. This prospective, randomized, single-blinded placebo-controlled study evaluates the efficacy and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation (ABMSCT) in T2DM. Twenty-one patients with triple oral antidiabetic drug failure and requiring insulin ≥0.4 IU per kg per day with HbA1c <7.5% were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 11) and control group (n = 10) and followed for 12 months.

Introduction
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as a viable results for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) have predominated in experimental models whereas the majority of clinical trials have used MSCs derived from adipose tissue (AT-MSCs), thus there is little consensus on the optimal tissue source.

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease with continuous or recurrent symptoms. A 42-year-old male patient with intermittent diarrhea accompanied by bloody mucopurulent stools was admitted to our hospital. The diagnosis of UC was confirmed by a combination of laboratory examination, colonoscopy, and histological assay. The patient developed herpes zoster in the hospital,